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October 22, 2017
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Bayesian Analysis in Mplus

Quoting van de Schoot et al. (2016). A Systematic Review of Bayesian Papers in Psychology: The Last 25 Years. Forthcoming in Psychological Methods:

While the Bayesian statistical program BUGS was already created in 1989[1], the more familiar (and most popular) version WinBUGS (Lunn, Thomas, Best, & Spiegelhalter, 2000) was not developed until 1997. Up until 2012, WinBUGS was by far the most popular Bayesian program being used in regression-based papers; it was implemented in almost half of all empirical papers up until this point. During this same time, there was a wide range of software packages and programs that were cited only once or twice, making BUGS the clear favorite, see also the software overview presented in Spiegelhalter et al. (2000). The popularity of WinBUGS has faded post-2012 with the advent and publicizing of alternative programs. From 2013-2014, only 8.8% of empirical papers used WinBUGS, and only 10.0% used it in 2015. Other packages such as JAGS (Plummer, 2016; 12.3% in 2013-14 and 17.5% in 2015) and Mplus (L. K. Muthén & Muthén, 1998-2015, 22.8% in 2013-14 and 20.0% in 2015) are becoming much more popular in the empirical Bayesian literature, with Mplus taking over the leading position from 2013 onward.

[1] Based on information retrieved from http://www.mrc-bsu.cam.ac.uk/software/bugs/